POUPÉES RUSSES

POUPÉES RUSSES

Techniques: acrylique/huile/graphite Dimensions: 80X60cm Disponible

MAISON DE POUPÉE

MAISON DE POUPÉE

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 75X50cm collection privée

DESIGN DINETTE

DESIGN DINETTE

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: A4 collection privée

ÉCHEC ET MAT

ÉCHEC ET MAT

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: A4 collection privée

STRICKE

STRICKE

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 30X60cm collection privée

ÇA BARBE !

ÇA BARBE !

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 100X80cm collection privée

LE GRAND MÉCANO

LE GRAND MÉCANO

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 75X50cm collection privée

SECRET DÉFENSE

SECRET DÉFENSE

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 100X75cm collection privée

COMODITÉS SUR PALIER

COMODITÉS SUR PALIER

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 75X50cm collection privée

SAC DE BILLES

SAC DE BILLES

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 30X60cm collection privée

TEDDY À MAL AUX PIEDS

TEDDY À MAL AUX PIEDS

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: A4 collection privée

GARES A PARIS

GARES A PARIS

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 75X50cm collection privée

le_rêve_des_jours_sans3

le_rêve_des_jours_sans3

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 50X75cm collection privée

boum bis

boum bis

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 50X75cm collection privée

boum

boum

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 50X75cm collection privée

chronique_d'un_crash_annoncé

chronique_d'un_crash_annoncé

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 75X50cm collection privée

playmo

playmo

Techniques: acrylique/huile Dimensions: 30X90cm collection privée

LUDIQUE PARIS

LUDIQUE PARIS

Technique: linogravure Dimensions: A4 Disponible ?/30

ludo générique

ludo générique

Technique: linogravure Dimensions: A4 Disponible ?/30

LEPARIS DU JOUET

 BETRAYED BY …THE TOYS

 

Going to an exhibition of Iskias’s paintings means taking the risk of playing a game which draws us into a reality from which we cannot re-emerge unscathed. It means agreeing to be sucked up, hypnotized, engulfed, swept along by the crowd, propelled through the streets of Paris, constantly jostled. It also means accepting to be crammed tight in the underground, to be deafened by all the city’s noises – cries , laughter, weeping, the squealing of brakes, backfiring car-engines, roaring sounds, sirens wailing – and finding it hard to breathe the city’s heavy air.

 

In his paintings, Iskias tries to get us to relive all our sensations with an electrified intensity, but if the passer-by doesn’t make the necessary effort, he won’t see anything. Iskias really blows us away, not only by means of clever ostentation but also through all the seething hustle and bustle building up and dying down. All the nooks and crannies of his paintings are completely inhabited, at once arousing our curiosity. Each painting unfolds its story and plays on metonymy to achieve the impossible bet of making us feel anxious while simultaneously making us smile. In Iskias’s world, enjoyment involves both pain and pleasure.

 

The illusionist perspective subtly introduces imaginary spaces in realistic spaces, and gives shape to the setting. Haussmann-style apartment buildings, grey streets and squalid underground passages constitute a meticulously elaborate backdrop within a painted representation which is both subtle and precise, depicting scenes which swarm with fluorescent creatures from a crazy counter-culture who bustle about in the machine-like clutter of a bazaar stall … Barbie dolls, Lego sets, Meccano pieces, PlayMobil characters, model soldiers, cuddly toys, miniature cars – they all come to life, no longer playing children’s games but those of adults, of enslaved human beings who have been reduced to toys … disillusioned toys. The worn-out teddy bears seem to be having a hard time, the dishevelled dolls feign their power of seduction, the PlayMobil characters come alive, the sex-toys stand erect and the toy soldiers defend their secrets … but why doesn’t Peter Pan want to grow up ? Doesn’t Pinocchio find himself trapped on “Pleasure Island  while plans for an economic conspiracy and a factory for turning out cannon fodder are being hatched ? In “Secret Defence”, a head of state in well-fed monarch-fashion hides his ogre-like face behind a depraved smile as he looks out from the top of his palace. Like Medusa, his octopus-like tentacles challenge anyone who might try and creep in to dethrone him.

 

On Iskias’s artistic stage, everything is a game – a  diabolical game in which childhood toys are anything but innocent. In his view, they never have been – they have always been part of the conspiracy. On discovering this act of deception, Iskias the visionary artist opens our eyes wide to ensure we don’t miss this sight which bears such bitter truths.

 

Thanks to his paintings which demonstrate a delicately rich colour range, everything we hate about Paris becomes beautiful, and Iskias has fun with this thanks to his humour which ranges from good-natured mockery to the most acerbic causticity. Make no mistake, we are in front of an art form which is deeply committed in its criticism of society.

 

Just like in certain fables, the person who observes the scene scrutinizes, analyzes, mocks, becomes ironic, protests vehemently. The paintings simultaneously display Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World”, the crushing-machine from “The Wall” and a Tim Burton fantasy… Our childhood monsters swallow up all our childhoods and leave us unprotected in our frailty in front of Big Brother and the exposed illusion of the Wizard of Oz.

 

Strips of newspaper pasted to the canvas as a backing constitute the background on which Iskias builds his scenery, revealing current event headlines of an internationalist nature which touch us and shake up our daily lives. The painted or pasted texts which emerge from the canvas –or which are added to it – intersperse, accompany or jostle the paintings’ characters. Snatches of text and plays on words abound – often superfluous, sometimes by way of a caption, or simply as jokers thrown in by Iskias to help us see through the mysteries and the illusions.

 

“This is not a Toy” – an allusion to Magritte – reveals the bitter betrayal perpetrated by the toys. From below, we see anonymous onlookers behind their windows, but when we move from the bustle of the street to the privacy of people’s apartments, the restricted space in the bedsits reveals a parsimonious reverse side of the setting – one which is narrow, confined, cluttered and stifling, but where everything is absurdly within arm’s reach: within reach of someone whose destiny is both tragic and pathetic.

 

What we remember from Iskias’s paintings is a plethora of concentrated details which reveal a sensory hyper-acuteness that has been manifest for a long time. Just like Pandora’s Box, a painting needs time to disclose its patiently passed-on stories. Iskias plays with us before treading the path to victory – getting people to see, helping them to become aware, and encouraging them to take up the fight to change the crazy world we live in.

 

Marie Gauthier

Agrégée in Plastic Arts; Visual Artist

La trahison des jouets   

 

Entrer dans une exposition de tableaux d’Iskias, c’est risquer de jouer un jeu qui nous engage dans le réel,  d’où l’on ne sort pas indemne. C’est accepter d’être aspiré, hypnotisé, englouti… d’être entrainé par la foule, de parcourir Paris, d’être bousculé. C’est accepter d’être entassé dans le métro,  d’être assourdi  par tous les bruits, les cris, les rires, les pleurs, les grincements, les pétarades, les ronflements, les sirènes. C’est respirer difficilement un air encombré. Dans ses tableaux, Iskias nous fait revivre toutes nos sensations avec une acuité électrisée. Le passant, s’il ne s’y colle pas, n’y voit rien. Iskias nous en met plein la vue, pas seulement dans le sens d’une ostentation habile, mais dans le grouillement de tous les affairements  qui s’y nouent et dénouent. Les toiles sont habitées jusque dans les moindres recoins… attisant notre curiosité. Chaque tableau déploie son histoire, et joue la métonymie, réalisant l’impossible pari de nous inquiéter tout en nous faisant sourire. Dans son monde la jouissance est souffrance et plaisir à la fois.

La perspective illusionniste introduit subtilement les espaces imaginaires dans les espaces réalistes et structure le décor. Les immeubles haussmanniens, les rues grises, les souterrains glauques, sont le décor méticuleusement élaboré dans une figuration peinte, subtile et rigoureuse, d’un théâtre où pullulent des créatures fluorescentes d’un underground déjanté, qui s’activent dans une machinerie d’étalage de bazar : barbies, legos, meccanos, playmobils®, petits soldats, peluches, voitures miniaturisées s’animent et jouent non plus les jeux de l’enfance, mais ceux des adultes, d’humains asservis réduits à des jouets… à des jouets désenchantés. Les nounours usés souffrent, les poupées échevelées feignent la séduction, les playmobils® s’animent, les sex-toys se dressent, les petits soldats défendent des secrets… Pourquoi Peter Pan ne veut-il pas grandir ? Pinocchio ne se fait-il pas piégé dans « l’île aux plaisirs », tandis que se trament la conspiration économique et la fabrique de chair à canon… Dans Secret Défense, du haut de son palais,  un chef d’Etat, en monarque repu, cache son visage d’ogre derrière un sourire dépravé. Ses tentacules de poulpe, telle Méduse, défient quiconque s’insinuerait pour le détrôner.

Dans ce théâtre, tout est jeu ! Un jeu infernal ! Les jouets de l’enfance ne sont pas naïfs. Pour Iskias, il semble qu’ils ne l’aient jamais été.  Depuis toujours, ils font partie du complot. Découvrant la supercherie, Iskias, en artiste visionnaire, nous écarquille les paupières pour que nous ne manquions pas ce spectacle porteur d’acerbes vérités.

Grâce à sa peinture riche en chromatismes délicats, tout ce qu’on peut détester de Paris devient beau, et Iskias s’en amuse avec un humour qui va de la moquerie bon enfant à la causticité la plus acide. Ne nous y trompons pas, nous sommes devant un art engagé dans la critique de la société.

 

spectateurs anonymes… Quand on passe du théâtre de la rue à l’intimité des appartements, l’espace des « studettes » révèle un envers économe du décor, étroit, serré, encombré, étouffant où tout est absurdement à portée de main : à portée de main d’un être au destin tragique et dérisoire.

On retiendra de la peinture d’Iskias une multitude de détails concentrés qui révèlent une hyperacuité sensitive établie depuis longtemps. Telle la boîte de Pandore, la toile nécessite du temps pour livrer ses histoires patiemment inoculées. Iskias joue avec nous et mène sa partie à la victoire : le temps du voir, celui de la prise de conscience, d’une incitation à s’engager pour changer ce monde fou.

 

Marie Gauthier

Agrégé d’arts plastiques, plasticienne 

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now